MAKE A PROPOSAL
 
     
SUBMIT PROPOSAL

 
   
 PROPOSALS BROCHURE
 
   
 GUIDANCE NOTES
 
   
 RIGHTS
 
     
CONGRESS REVIEWERS
 


CONGRESS THEMES
 
 
CONGRESS STRUCTURE

 
 
AWARDS AND PRIZES
 
 
CONGRESS ORGANISATION
 
 
KEY NOTE PAPERS

 
     

Congress Themes

We are living in a fast-changing world, which challenges the psychoanalytic ideals of reflection and time for thought.  How do these changes affect the mind, our technique, and our consulting rooms?

The tools and theories we use to attend those who seek psychoanalytic treatment are one of the main focuses of this Congress.  How have we developed?  Have we more to offer today than 50 or 100 years ago? How have new technologies and other changes influenced our practice, and how are we answering these various challenges? What are the further developments in technique and how do we deal with the impact of technology and high mobility in our practice? The clinical and theoretical presentations at this Congress will show how each analyst works through and thinks about these changes.   

Taking into account your responses to the ‘Call for Ideas’, we have identified a number of sub-themes that may interest you when you send in a proposal to the Boston Congress Scientific Programme Committee.

Sub-Themes


1.    Theory and technique: what is the unconcious today?; the nature of the human psyche; psychoanalytic methods; the nature of anxieties in the 21st century; psychoanalytic work in different settings; creativity in a changing world; time and space in analytic work today.

2.    Diversity: new family configurations; sexual and gender identity; race and racism; homophobia, transphobia and biphobia.

3.    Culture: times, ethics and culture; interaction with the human mind; immigration, emigration and mobility; oppression and anti-oppressive practice; aging and death; addiction.

4.    Technology: the use of new electronic tools and their impact on psychoanalysis and the analytic setting; virtual reality and the internet; the use of Skype for training, study groups, treatment and supervision; the ever-present connectedness and how we think about intimacy.